Tag Archives: Metro Station

Madrid Attraction: Palacio de Cristal de la Arganzuela

imageAfter an unintentional, albeit exhilirating exploration of Matadero Madrid, Arganzuela district’s center of culture and arts, I finally continued to walk to my original destination, the Madrid Rio, which is also located within the same area. I have always wanted to see for myself what they say is the vast expanse of the park as well as its impressive outdoor fitness facilities. Also, this Arganzuela park is well-known as a project that promotes the creation of more “green areas” in Madrid, and so, I was raring to write a blog article about it.

But once again, as I continued to tread the way to the park,  I stopped in my tracks literally, as I was greeted by the sight of a beautiful building that’s looking unique because it is made mostly of glass. The sign board in front reveals its name — the Palacio de Cristal de la Arganzuela. However, as I managed to look past its glass facade, I could discern that it is a large terrarium.

Even from afar, you can peer through the glass walls and see that its interior is filled with plants of different kinds, silver-colored tubes that are perhaps parts of the HVAC equipment of the facility,  large vats or containers, and vertical steel bars that hold the glass ceiling in place, serving as a strong reinforcement.

Formerly called the Nave de Patatas, the glass and steel edifice was once a part of the Matadero Madrid complex of the distrito de Arganzuela, until eventually it was transformed into a large museum of plants and herbs that it is today — a gargantuan greenhouse for all sorts of flora, a greening and environmental effort that the City of Madrid is proud of.

This garden / terrarium facility is also called Invernadero (in English it means greenhouse) and even known by a much longer name, Invernadero de Palacio de Cristal de la Arganzuela.

What to see in the crystal palace of Arganzuela

The glass house is so huge that it is able to take in and managage around 9,000 different species of plants, all of which are grouped according to the climate that they thrive in and flourish.

1. There are basically four different groups of plants; these are the tropical, subtropical, cacti and crass, and water plants. The Palace’s management made sure that the different groups of plants not only survived but flourished. This is ensured by simulating the type of climate necessary for every group of flora.

2. Apart from perhaps thousands of species of flora, the plant palace also features a variety of waterfalls and fountains filled with different species of fish. Various types of birds are also bred and cared for inside the greenhouse.

image
imageFront Facade and entrance to the Plant Greenhouse
imagePalacio de Cristal de la Arganzuela also has an equally beautiful back facade and entrance

Visit Palacio de Cristal de la Arganzuela

Location of site: Paseo de la Chopera 10 (near the Matadero Madrid Complex, Madrid Rio, and the Rio de Manzanares)

How to Go:

Via Auto bus: EMT lines 6, 19, 45, 59, 78, 76, 148, 247

Via City Subway: Legazpi Madrid Metro Station (Lines 3, 6)

Hours of Visit:

Mondays: The site is closed

Tuesday to Friday: 9 AM to 3 PM

Saturday and Sunday: 10 AM to 2 PM

Entrance Price:

Admission is Free

 Map:

Metro Museo: Plaza de Chamberi Ghost Museum in Madrid

Had your fill of the conventional museums that are aplenty, found in almost every barrio of the city?  Looking for a museum in Madrid that veers away from the norm? Here’s one museo that’s quite different from the rest — the Metro Museum in Plaza de Chamberi, Madrid.

imageLine from Station Chamberi to Tetuan

Fantasma de Estacion de Metro de Chamberi

imageOld-styled metal entrance to the station – a recreation. This ghost station at Chamberi boasts of over 170,000 visitors

It was functioning at first, like any other Madrid Metro station. In fact, it was one of the original stations of Linea 1 that ran from Cuatro Camino to Puerta del Sol. However, for whatever reason, the early administration of the train system had to  close it down.

Fast track to current times, and the metro is now a museo.

I had the chance to visit it just recently. And indeed, as soon as I stepped inside, somehow I experienced that feel of an eerie air that seems to pervade all around.  It is the same weird, if not ghastly feeling you might get if you ride the metro, and try to have a glimpse of the station as the train passes through it.

imageThe old Line 1 included stations that are also found in the modern line, like Cuatro Caminos and Estrecho

 imageOld notices on the ticket prices posted on the Wall

This must be the reason why it is called the Ghost station of Madrid. While the area quite had the ghostly feel, nothing of the supernatural occurred. Thankfully, no fastasma showed up, as seeing one would really scare the daylights out of me. At any rate, I’m sure Madrid Metro and the people behind the museo don’t mind the title – it might even add great to prospective visitors, instead of scaring them.

imageCompanies had their advertisements painted into the tiled walls of the metro

While this metro stop is not useful anymore as a station, it certainly served well in the past, as it acted as a major shelter for civilians who needed a safe place to stay during the Civil war. It was also used as  a warehouse where vital supplies were hidden.

imageGal was one of the major companies that advertised at Chamberi Station. You will have a good glance of it and other old advertisements still posted on the tiled walls, as well as the early logos of the train system as you look through the train window as it passes through

The fantasma museo concept started in 2008, when the railway management decided to reopen it but as a museum. Everything within, specifically the design and display, was the work of Spanish architect Antonio Palacios, the same genius who was commissioned to design the Palacio de Cibeles. He was also responsible in creating the interior areas of the early  station.

imageTrain runs fast that you could see as it bypasses the Chamteri Station

Metro Museum in Madrid is compact, its area is more or less similar to that of the current modern stations. In fact, you can explore the place and finish the tour in under thirty minutes. Still, it was effective in providing interesting facts about the history of the station. Needless to say,  the museum offers an interesting glimpse to the beginnings of Plaza Chamberi station.

imageCarabana is another company that has its ad posted at the tiled wall of the station

imageThe ad is literally translated as “Philips Lamps – the best in the world”

imageEntrance to the museum

Where located: Plaza de Chamberi, Madrid

Touring Days & Hours:

1. Friday – 11AM to 1PM and 5PM to 7PM

2. Saturday and Sunday – 10AM to 2PM

How to go: The fastest and nearest line to take is Line 1. Get off at either Station Iglesia or Bilbao, and a few minutes of walking will bring you to your destination. If you go down at Metro Iglesia, you must take Calle de Santa Engracia

imageThere is also a film showing at the end of the tour. People are fortunate to be treated to a unique Madrid museo that features the Old Metro. My visit was invaluable as it transported me to the past; ticket machines and booths, the yellow and tarnished signs, the wall ads – all are reminders of the good old Metro Station at Chamberi

Plaza de Chamberi: A Beautiful Madrid Square

After a interesting tour of the museum, I thought that the Plaza de Chamberi is the next place for me to check out. In fact, my original plan is to see just the museum, but realized that the plaza is just nearby. And so, off to it I go. One thing I noticed about the place is that it’s well-kept. The promenades within are clean, like they are swept of fallen leaves at all times of the day. You can enjoy the sight of a fountain, its water supply flowing creating a number of water spouts in the middle. Also found in the midst of the fountain are three child statues. Also found within the square are the church, the municipal hall, and a few local bars.

Beautiful Images of Plaza de Chamberi, Madrid

imagePlaza y Iglesia of Chamberi – beautiful and well-maintained, one that you would like to stay all afternoon even on a hot summer day

image A safe place that’s conducive for child’s play. At the foreground is the Iglesia delas Siervas de Maria (Convent of the Servants of Mary) by Francisco de Cubas

imageFountain in the midst of the Chamberi plaza

imageSenor Francisco Largo Caballero, a popular politician and union leader, was born in Chamberi

imageMarker of the El Racing Club attached to the wall of the Municipal Hall. The organization, which was created in 1914 was popularly associated to the place

imageThis beautiful walkway within the plaza leads to the Iglesia de las Siervas de Maria

imageA fews bars and cafes situated alongside the municipio are frequented by locals

imageSimple yet elegant facade of the municipal hall